Finney, Demana, Waits, Kennedy, Bressoud, Calculus Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, 5th Edition

Finney, Demana, Waits, Kennedy, Bressoud, Calculus Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, 5th Edition
 
 

Authors

Ross L. Finney

Ross Finney received his undergraduate degree and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He taught at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Finney worked as a consultant for the Educational Development Center in Newton, Massachusetts. He directed the Undergraduate Mathematics and its Applications Project (UMAP) and was founding editor of the UMAP Journal. Later, he traveled with a Mathematical Association of America delegation to China on a teacher education project through People to People International.

Dr. Finney co-authored a number of Addison-Wesley textbooks, including Calculus; Calculus and Analytic Geometry; Elementary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra; and Calculus for Engineers and Scientists. Dr. Finney’s co-authors were deeply saddened by the death of their colleague and friend on August 4, 2000.

Franklin D. Demana

Frank Demana received his master’s degree in mathematics and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Currently, he is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Ohio State University. As an active supporter of the use of technology to teach and learn mathematics, he is co-founder of the international Teachers Teaching with Technology professional development program.

He has been the director and co-director of more than $10 million of National Science Foundation and foundational grant activities, including a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education Mathematics and Science Educational Research program awarded to The Ohio State University. Along with frequent presentations at professional meetings, he has published a variety of articles in the areas of computer- and calculator-enhanced mathematics instruction.

Dr. Demana is also co-founder of the annual International Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics. He was co-recipient of the 1997 Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award presented by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics, and co-recipient of the 1998 Christofferson-Fawcett Mathematics Education Award presented by the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Dr. Demana co-authored Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic; Essential Algebra: A Calculator Approach; Transition to College Mathematics; College Algebra and Trigonometry: A Graphing Approach; College Algebra: A Graphing Approach; Precalculus: Functions and Graphs; and Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach.

Bert K. Waits

Bert Waits received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University and taught Ohio State students for many years before retiring as Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Dr. Waits co-founded the international Teachers Teaching with Technology professional development program and co-director or principal investigator of several large projects funded by the National Science Foundation.

Active in both the Mathematical Association of America and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, he published more than 70 articles in professional journals and conducted countless lectures, workshops, and minicourses on how to use computer technology to enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Dr. Waits was co-recipient of the 1997 Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award presented by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics and of the 1998 Christofferson-Fawcett Mathematics Education Award presented by the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He was the co-founder of the ICTCM and was one of six authors of the high school portion of the groundbreaking 1989 NCTM Standards.

Dr. Waits was hard at work on revisions for the fifth edition of this calculus textbook when he died prematurely on July 27, 2014, leaving behind a powerful legacy in the legions of teachers whom he inspired. Dr. Waits coauthored Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic; College Algebra and Trigonometry: A Graphing Approach; College Algebra: A Graphing Approach; Precalculus: Functions and Graphs; and Intermediate Algebra: A Graphing Approach.

Daniel Kennedy

Dan Kennedy received his undergraduate degree from the College of the Holy Cross and his master’s degree and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Since 1973 he has taught mathematics at the Baylor School in Chattanooga, Tennessee, where he holds the Cartter Lupton Distinguished Professorship.

Dr. Kennedy joined the Advanced Placement® Calculus Test Development Committee in 1986, and then in 1990 became the first high school teacher in 35 years to chair that committee. It was during his tenure as chair that the program moved to require graphing calculators and laid the early groundwork for the 1998 reform of the Advanced Placement Calculus curriculum.

The author of the 1997 Teacher’s Guide—AP® Calculus, Dr. Kennedy has conducted more than 50 workshops and institutes for high school calculus teachers. His articles on mathematics teaching have appeared in the Mathematics Teacher and the American Mathematical Monthly, and he is a frequent speaker on education reform at professional and civic meetings. Dr. Kennedy was named a Tandy Technology Scholar in 1992 and a Presidential Award winner in 1995. He coauthored Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic; Prentice Hall Algebra I; Prentice Hall Geometry; and Prentice Hall Algebra 2. 

David M. Bressoud

David Bressoud received his undergraduate degree from Swarthmore College and Ph.D. from Temple University. He taught at Penn State from 1977 to 1994, is currently a DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics at Macalester College, and is a former president of the Mathematical Association of America.

He is the author of several textbooks on number theory, combinatorics, vector calculus, and real analysis, all with a strong historical emphasis. He taught AP Calculus at the State College Area High School in 1990–91, began as an AP Reader in 1993, and served on the AP Calculus Test Development Committee for six years and as its chair for three of those years. He currently serves on the College Board Mathematical Sciences Academic Advisory Committee.

He has been principal investigator for numerous grants, including two large National Science Foundation grants to study Characteristics of Successful Programs in College Calculus and Progress Through Calculus. He also writes Launchings, a monthly blog on issues of undergraduate mathematics education.